Randoms

- Like I’ve been saying, "Note that this is a legislator, supposedly the author of a law, asking regulators how/whether they’ll enforce it, and to clarify/alter it to make it simpler."

- Wait, I thought this was too much diversity?

- Democracy in one sentence: “I suppose his nonsense suits their nonsense”

- Roll on decrepitude

- Lots of the crime around me is thefts of smartphones. How long will it be before this sort of crime is solved by technological advances? It seems to me like it could easily be solved now.

- Every so often, Yglesias has a post that’s indistinguishable from writing "white people are more productive than black people or Hispanic people." But he always writes it in such a complicated way.

- HS on time orientation

- They’re stealin’ our jobs

- In totally unrelated new, there are lots of Asians

- Remember all those white South Africans who said they would all get killed if apartheid ended? Yea, me neither.

- Some Goethe quotes

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4 Responses to Randoms

  1. B says:

    Re: the Washington Times article-I’m amazed any mainstream news outlet would publish something that truthful, even if it’s only about one of the hundreds of diversity-infested bureaucracies running the US (from the military to my local DMV.) Does this signify the beginning of some kind of Ottepel’?

  2. asdf says:

    What’s interesting about the Yglesias quote is he’s probably one of those dudes that curses the fact that “wrong kind of white people” from southern and midwest states force republicans on him. He also probably complains that they take tax money from the blue states.

  3. KK says:

    That ‘lots of Asians’ article is certainly framed in an interesting way. The real punchline is the last sentence:

    “America’s Hispanic population grew by 43 percent over the past decade”

    Another day, another victory for The News! I’m surprised they actually listed that number there.

  4. Especially after last week at the Supreme Court, there should be no surprise that legislators don’t actually read the laws. After all, they were discussing who–the Court or Congress–would have the tedious job of working through thousands of pages of law to decide which parts to cut and which to keep. But if legislators knew what they “wrote,” they should have little problem telling the Court what should go or not and why or why not…

    And this only deals with federal law – I don’t know how much state legislators know of their own law, but since many of them are effectively only part-time employees, I would surprised if they situation were significantly different in state legislatures.

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