Progress

From AmCon:

The contemporary West’s dominant narrative is the story of human progress. It reigns throughout the Establishment—politically, intellectually, economically, even theatrically (which is important in a decadent age). To question the progressive narrative instantly positions a person or institution beyond the pale: a weirdo, kook, or nutcase. Such people do not merit rational discourse; rather, they are offered psychological treatment.

As formidable as it first appears, the progressive narrative’s dominant position may soon be shaken. Just as the Establishment depends on the progressive narrative for legitimacy, so the narrative depends on the Establishment for protection. But the Establishment itself is failing.

Politically, the Establishment—which includes most members of both parties and almost all office-holders—cannot come to grips with America’s decline. It can act only within a narrow range, limited by controlling interests at court that feed off the country’s decay. Its range of action is too narrow to conceive and implement policies that might reverse decline.

Intellectually, the Establishment has been reduced to parroting the shibboleths of political correctness. Anyone with a contrary idea is not incorrect for this or that reason; he is a “thisist” or a “thatist.” When the only remaining intellectual prop of a ruling caste is name-calling, it is bankrupt.

Do read the rest.

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13 Responses to Progress

  1. Red says:

    I’m not seeing a link to AmCon.

  2. RS says:

    all too acute…

  3. Tschafer says:

    Good to see that Lind is back on track. He was off in la-la land there for a while, as Mencius pointed out.

    • Alrenous says:

      I’d like to see that pointing out. Where can I find it?

      He’s like to go off again if he doesn’t realize conservatism, Christianity, and monarchy are also ideologies.

  4. PRCalDude says:

    I wouldn’t say Lind is back:

    William S. Lind is director of the American Conservative Center for Public Transportation.

    lol.

    I’m getting real sick of conservatives who think the Northern European man needs to go back to Rome and monarchy for our problems to go away.

    The Protestant Reformation pointed to some genuine abuses in the Church and also renewed the importance of Scripture. But the shattering of Christendom, the rise of an unsound doctrine of sola Scriptura, and the loss of the sacraments in much Christian worship were too high a price.

    This guy just crapped on all the Protestants who died for what they believed in countries like France. Ironically, having purged herself of all her Protestants through massacres and expulsions, France led the way in Enlightenment liberalism.

    I will never submit to a Pope in Rome. Ever. At all. Any ‘conservative’ suggesting that I – as a Northern European Protestant – should do so, is not worth hearing.

    None of these guys ever have anything useful to say about how to set up parallel institutions and organizations given the imminent collapse of the government they’re describing.

  5. John says:

    Hi, I am from Australia.
    I would suggest that the recent Avatar film was the necessary parable for our time.
    At a very basic level it was about the culture of life versus the anti-“culture” of death.Having already “created” a dying planet, just like we have, the techno-barbarian invaders were compelled by the inexorable UNCONSCIOUS logic of their “culture” to invade virgin territories, just like we always have.

    It was therefore interesting to note that all of those on the so called conservative side of the culture wars, including (and especially) those who presume to be religious, came out cheering for the “culture” of death.

    The scenario thus depicted in the film was the inevitable extension of the applied politics as pictured in dramatic fashion by this stark image.

    http://www.dartmouth.edu/~spanmod/mural/panel13.html

    This image is featured in The Pentagon of Power by Lewis Mumford, which in my opinion is still one of the best books re the origins, historical developments, and future BLEAK prospects of Western Civilization.

    Altogether I would further suggest that most/all so called “conservatives” are effectively very much in the thrall of the Myth of what Mumford called The Invisible Mega-Machine, or the “culture” of death that now patterns every minute fraction of USA “culture”.

    In his last public interview before his death Mumford expressed profound pessimism and despair re the Human Prospect. Because ALL of the negative trends that he warned us about had manifested even beyond his pessimistic predictions.

    Twenty years later the situation is almost infinitely worse.

  6. K(yle) says:

    Ironically, having purged herself of all her Protestants through massacres and expulsions, France led the way in Enlightenment liberalism.

    It’s not really ironic at all. The ‘purging’ of Catholics was a step along the way of purging Christianity in general. Your micro-analysis of this one event which ignores that there was a non-Jacobin Left that was Protestant and anti-Catholic.

    There is a pretty clear ideological cline that exists between the Royalist Catholic Right and the Neoplatonic Atheistic Left during the Enlightenment. Most ‘liberals’ during these times were Protestants and castigated the Catholic Church basically on the same demerits it is castigated upon today. Being ‘backwards’ and ‘reactionary’ and in the way of ‘progress’.

    France is really the only place that specifically Anti-Christian Liberals gained power, unless you include America, but I personally would not, Thomas Paine et al aside.

    • prcaldude@gmail.com says:

      There was a Jacobin Left that was Protestant? Where? There were hardly any left in France after the French wars of religion and the reign of the Sun King, and Jacobinism itself didn’t begin until roughly 100 years after Louis XIV’s death.

      I’ll heartily agree that there were many liberal Protestants during those years, but there was plenty of liberalism in the Catholic church as well, even back then. It’s just like Vatican II: while there were plenty of liberal “Protestants” ruining everything in the West during the 20th century, we didn’t somehow infiltrate Rome and force the passage of Vatican II – you did that to yourselves.

      Your analysis doesn’t realy make sense: there was a Jacobin Neoplatonic Atheistic Left (in France) that was heavily Protestant but helped to purge the country of Christianity in general?

      Also, the Catholic Church was never criticized on the basis of being “backwards” or “reactionary,” but you can launch into a study of the Institutes, the Westminster Standards, or 3 Forms of Unity if you don’t believe me. Issues of political governance did come up during the Reformation, but the Reformers devoted the overwhelming majority of their ink to religious reforms.

      • K(yle) says:

        there was a Jacobin Neoplatonic Atheistic Left (in France) that was heavily Protestant but helped to purge the country of Christianity in general?

        Did you miss the “non” prefix in there, before the ‘Jacobin Left’. As in there were liberals that were Protestant and ant-Catholic, which is exactly and clearly what I stated if you had bothered to read what I actually wrote instead of going off on some knee-jerk defense of your religion.


        Calvin spends a lot of time in book IV of the Institutes defending the diversity of governments with which men are ruled and how they should be obeyed as far as that means obeying God’s Law. Also, in his introductory letter to King Charles, he spends time telling the king that Protestants were not rebels and had no desire to challenge his authority.

        On the Lutheran side, Luther eventually spent a lot of time chastising Protestants who believed religious reform involved taking up arms against your rulers.

        Spending a lot of time distancing themselves from the liberal Protestants, who were one step removed from the radicals including anti-theists. All Fellow Travelers.

        They addressed the point because observations had been made and clearly a lot of Protestants did in fact draw a parallel between Protestantism and Revolution.

        The liberal Protestants were the Pinkos to the Jacobin “commies”. Where Protestants won out, there were lots and lots of pro-Revolution liberal Protestants. Where they lost and were suppressed we got Jacobins.

        Calvin and Luther’s objections are the equivalent of romantic rap music with the rapper constantly saying how he’ll never cheat (again). The audience only needs such strong reassurances because there is a lot of reasonable doubt. It’s not something a normal party not held in doubt need so strongly announce.

  7. prcaldude@gmail.com says:

    I also hasten to add that Calvin and Luther were both fine with the concept of monarchy. Calvin spends a lot of time in book IV of the Institutes defending the diversity of governments with which men are ruled and how they should be obeyed as far as that means obeying God’s Law. Also, in his introductory letter to King Charles, he spends time telling the king that Protestants were not rebels and had no desire to challenge his authority.

    On the Lutheran side, Luther eventually spent a lot of time chastising Protestants who believed religious reform involved taking up arms against your rulers.

  8. prcaldude@gmail.com says:

    I did miss the “non,” but I don’t see how my analysis suffers too much. You’re complaining about French Protestants and a time when they didn’t exist. They weren’t fomenting revolution in France at all prior – they were getting murdered for about 100 years at least. You’re just doing the usual Catholic victim-blaming.

    Ironic that you’re suggesting my reaction is “knee-jerk” when you clearly know nothing about the Reformation and doing the typical Catholic whining about Protestantism. Sorry your church is in such a sorry state, not my fault.

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